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Before Isaac Allerton and Thomas Cushman, Native people had been living at this site for at least 6000-8000 years.  Occupations spanned the Middle Archaic to Late Woodland Periods.
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Eleven pieces of Native American lithic material are present in a small artifact collection housed at the Kingston, Massachusetts Public Library Local History Room. This collection includes five complete projectile points: three Late Woodland Levanna points (quartz, hornfels, rhyolite), one Late Archaic Greene point of rhyolite and one Middle Archaic Neville Variant point made out of rhyolite. Two drill tips are present, one of Normanskill chert and one of rhyolite. Two rhyolite bifaces are present, as well as one two-holed soapstone gorget with incised lines on both sides and one argillite fragment with a hole in it.

In the Plimoth Plantation collection are one Neville point dating to the Middle Archaic as well as two Stark points, also from the Middle Archaic. A second occupation at the site which left traces was sometime around 5000 to 2000 years ago during the Late Archaic. Within this broad expanse of time, eight spear points were left at the site when the occupants left.

The final period for which we have evidence of native people at the site is from 1600 to 400 years ago, from the Middle to Late Woodland periods. From the size of the points found at the site, these people were probably using the bow and arrow. The material for two of the arrowheads found at the site were probably highly valued by their owners. One was made out of a type of chert which is only found in New York state. The other is from a type of stone only found in the Reading area of Pennsylvania.

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